Data From The ESA Gaia Star Mapping Satellite, Due To The Recent Mockery Of The Milky Way
Data From The ESA Gaia Star Mapping Satellite, Due To The Recent Mockery Of The Milky Way

Data From The ESA Gaia Star Mapping Satellite, Due To The Recent Mockery Of The Milky Way

Data from the ESA Gaia star mapping satellite, due to the recent mockery of the Milky Way or the ongoing encounter with the satellite galaxy.

ESA Gaia star mapping satellite data suggests that the prevailing disks, or wobbles, of our Milky Way also have a maximum spin speed.

The warp revolves around the galactic center faster than expected, completing a turnoff in 600 to 700 million years. However, it is still slower than the speed at which the stars on the disk revolve around the galactic center.

For example, the Sun completes a circle in about 220 million years. The speed of the pre-war war led an international team of astronomers to believe it was due to a recent or minor collision with a smaller galaxy.

Our Milky Way is structured with its warped galactic disk, where hundreds of billions of stars live. Data from ESA’s Gaia spacecraft recently demonstrated that disc deformation is the above, essentially similar to a spinning top.

Astronomers believe that the rate of deformation is so high that it must have been caused by a powerful event, perhaps due to a continuous collision with another smaller galaxy that is agitated through the disk like a rock thrown into the water.

Image by Stephen Payne-Wardener / NASA / JPL-Caltech / ESA. Our Milky Way is structured along its galactic disk, where hundreds of billions of stars reside. Data from ESA’s Gaia spacecraft recently demonstrated that disc deformation is the above, essentially spinning like a wobbly spinning top.

Astronomers believe that the rate of deformation is so high that it must have been caused by a powerful event, perhaps due to a collision with another smaller galaxy that is stirred through the disk like a rock thrown into the water.

An astronomer at the Astrophysical Observatory in Turin, Drs. Eloisa Poggio and her colleagues measured the precedence rate using 12 million giant stars from another Gaia data publication of the Milky Way mockery.

They found that it is eastward in the direction of galactic rotation at 10.86 3 0.03 (statistic) is 3.20 (systematic) km / s. “We measured warp speed by comparing the data with our models,” said Dr. Poggio.

“Depending on the speed reached, the deformation would complete a detour around the center of the Milky Way in 600 to 700 million years.” This is much faster than we expected based on the predictions of other models, such as those that observe the effects of the non-spherical aura.

The precession rate and the magnitude of the warp favor the scenario that the warp is the result of a recent or ongoing encounter with the satellite galaxy rather than a remnant of the history of the former galaxy assembly. Astronomers do not yet know what galaxy can cause the wave or when the collision begins.

One of the contenders is the dwarf galaxy, a small satellite of the Milky Way that is leaving behind a stream of stars as a result of the gravitational pull of our galaxy and is believed to have exploded through galactic disks many times in the past.

Astronomers think that Dhanu will be gradually absorbed by the Milky Way. “With Gaia, for the first time, we have a lot of data about a large number of stars.

Whose movement is measured with such precision that we try to understand the mass movement of the galaxy and model the history of its Can formation,” he said. ESA Gaia project deputy scientist, Dr. Jose de Bruijne.

“This is something unique. This is actually the Gaia revolution.” As Tana-Bana and its prevalence appear on a galactic scale, scientists assure us that it has no notable effect on life on our planet. “

“The Sun is 26,000 light years away from the galactic center where the width of the warp is very small,” said Dr. Poggio.

“Our measurements were mainly dedicated to the external parts of the galactic disk, up to 52,000 light years from the galactic center and beyond.”

The results appear in the journal Nature Astronomy.

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